Why We Love Privacy (And You Should, Too!)

Privacy can be elusive to those who surf the web in the raw. Myriad websites across the globe are made aware of our presence from the moment we query a search engine, login to a social media site, read a blog post, or search for a product at Amazon. Our digital footprint can spread far and wide via all of the devices that we utilize to access the Internet too. Today, corporations and government may know more about our daily habits than our partner or best friend does.

Online Privacy Defined

Though the definition of online privacy differs from person to person – most of us would agree that we should be able to control what personal data is shared with the outside world. In an ideal setting – we should know who has access to our personal data; what purpose they are using our data for; and be made aware of when they access our private data. The ability to control who gets to peep at what should inherently be under our control (unless we choose to place our private data in the public realm).

You can read more at the Cocoon blog.


Celebrity Host Julie Moran sits down with Jeff Bermant CEO on The Balancing Act® on November 13th and 20th at 7:00 am (ET/PT) on Lifetime TV to discuss in detail the benefits and features of protecting your privacy with Cocoon.

The NSA Is Scaring Me!

From The Quivering Dog Department:

Ever since Snowden leaked the NSA brouhaha in June - I’ve been a dog on a mission, digging up NSA bones everywhere I can. 

My email is packed with alerts on NSA; surveillance; PRISM; XKeyscore.  


NOT THAT I HAVE ANYTHING TO HIDE.

But - I do believe in privacy and just like I would not want the NSA taking a shower with me; I do not want them reading my vacation plans either. 

So this morning - our company CEO (Jeff) sent me this (must have missed it in my alert deluge) —> NSA’s data reach greater than first thought, says report 

These revelations, if proven true, would be reminiscent of claims made by Mark Klein in 2006, who worked as an AT&T technician in San Francisco. Klein blew the whistle on the NSA’s involvement in domestic wiretapping, claiming the agency diverted Internet traffic through a splitter cabinet in a secure room, dubbed “Room 641A,” which was to be used only by NSA personnel.


I remember 2006 when Klien blew that whistle. It was downplayed and eventually buried. That was seven years ago and during the interim -> look how far the NSA has reached. Does that disturb you? It makes me angry and also at the same time -> I fear for my own digital actions. If I search for “one of their keywords” will I be placed on the no fly list? If I meet with a privacy activist, will my friends and family be monitored because of my connection to my activist friend? America is getting scary and pretty soon I fear that there will be no place left to hide. 

Please share your thoughts -don’t let me be the only shivering dog shaking like a dustmop here. Type everything in code so that they don’t read it. Friends don’t let friends use clear text… 

lookatluca:

I cannot imagine how surreal the world must feel to Glenn Greenwald from one day to another. What will they accuse him of next? Excellent commentary today by Rachel Maddow

lookatluca:

I cannot imagine how surreal the world must feel to Glenn Greenwald from one day to another. What will they accuse him of next? Excellent commentary today by Rachel Maddow