ritchie:


Lightbeam
I’ve recently been trying to figure out how the LinkedIn People You May Know anti-feature seems so sketchy in the data it’s pulling from email exchanges and accounts that I’ve never specifically linked to the site. Apparently the LinkedIn mobile apps will rip your entire contact list, and even if you don’t use these apps, it appears to somehow reverse-link the rest of us (based on real names, not email addresses) from the suckers who do. There are some ongoing attempts to try to get this pulled in, but LinkedIn doesn’t appear to have done anything illegal so far, rather has just been sneaky in making excellent use of the EULAs and app permissions notifications that everyone clicks through without reading.
Anyway, Lightbeam/Collusion is a Firefox and Chrome plugin that will illustrate how many other entities are putting their fingers in when you visit what may seem like an unrelated site. From what I can tell, LinkedIn isn’t illicitly directly connecting to Gmail or any other contact services. Thanks for the heads up TJ!
wikipedia:

Lightbeam (called Collusion in its experimental version) is an add-on for Firefox that displays third party tracking cookies placed on the user’s computer while visiting various websites. It displays a graph of the interactions and connections of sites visited and the tracking sites to which they provide information.

ritchie:

Lightbeam

I’ve recently been trying to figure out how the LinkedIn People You May Know anti-feature seems so sketchy in the data it’s pulling from email exchanges and accounts that I’ve never specifically linked to the site. Apparently the LinkedIn mobile apps will rip your entire contact list, and even if you don’t use these apps, it appears to somehow reverse-link the rest of us (based on real names, not email addresses) from the suckers who do. There are some ongoing attempts to try to get this pulled in, but LinkedIn doesn’t appear to have done anything illegal so far, rather has just been sneaky in making excellent use of the EULAs and app permissions notifications that everyone clicks through without reading.

Anyway, Lightbeam/Collusion is a Firefox and Chrome plugin that will illustrate how many other entities are putting their fingers in when you visit what may seem like an unrelated site. From what I can tell, LinkedIn isn’t illicitly directly connecting to Gmail or any other contact services. Thanks for the heads up TJ!

wikipedia:

Lightbeam (called Collusion in its experimental version) is an add-on for Firefox that displays third party tracking cookies placed on the user’s computer while visiting various websites. It displays a graph of the interactions and connections of sites visited and the tracking sites to which they provide information.

Why We Love Privacy (And You Should, Too!)

Privacy can be elusive to those who surf the web in the raw. Myriad websites across the globe are made aware of our presence from the moment we query a search engine, login to a social media site, read a blog post, or search for a product at Amazon. Our digital footprint can spread far and wide via all of the devices that we utilize to access the Internet too. Today, corporations and government may know more about our daily habits than our partner or best friend does.

Online Privacy Defined

Though the definition of online privacy differs from person to person – most of us would agree that we should be able to control what personal data is shared with the outside world. In an ideal setting – we should know who has access to our personal data; what purpose they are using our data for; and be made aware of when they access our private data. The ability to control who gets to peep at what should inherently be under our control (unless we choose to place our private data in the public realm).

You can read more at the Cocoon blog.


Celebrity Host Julie Moran sits down with Jeff Bermant CEO on The Balancing Act® on November 13th and 20th at 7:00 am (ET/PT) on Lifetime TV to discuss in detail the benefits and features of protecting your privacy with Cocoon.

[Infoworld] 11 sure signs you’ve been hacked

[Oh No -I’ve been hacked!] Here is a pretty good article from Infoworld about how to tell if you have been hacked and what to do about the hack(s)if you have been compromised.

  1. Fake antivirus messages
  2. Unwanted browser toolbars
  3. Redirected Internet searches
  4. Frequent random popups
  5. Your friends receive fake emails from your email account
  6. Your online passwords suddenly change
  7. Unexpected software installs
  8. Your mouse moves between programs and makes correct selections 
  9. Your antimalware software, Task Manager, or Registry Editor is disabled and can’t be restarted
  10. Your bank account is missing money
  11. You get calls from stores about nonpayment of shipped goods
Infoworld states that “Most malicious hacking originates from one of three vectors: unpatched software, running Trojan horse programs, and responding to fake phishing emails.”

 

The College Student’s Guide to Cyber-security

The dog day afternoons of summer are coming to a close. It’s almost time for classes to begin. If you are not a geek - you might not be up on the latest cyber-security threats and this is why this cyber-security guide is meant for you. I won’t make you suffer through a babble of techno-geek language either. You should be able to cruise through this short guide with ease.

Cyber-security on a PC

Though this is one of the most neglected areas of computer maintenance,  it is essential to have a clean back-up source if your system has a hard disk failure (crashes) or your data and system files become compromised by a virus.

[pullquote]A weak password such as 123456passwordabc123, or using your first name or pet’s name as your password is the Achilles heel of cyber-security. [/pullquote]

A weak password such as 123456passwordabc123, or using your first name or pet’s name as your password is the Achilles heel of cyber-security. Passwords are your first line of defense against cybercriminals. Create complex passwords for each site (do not share the same password at multiple sites), change them frequently and create accounts at sites that use good encryption.

This guide includes cyber-security tips for college students and anyone who wants to better secure their pc, Mac, or Smartphone.

Find out more a the Cocoon blog here.